Courses

Students Entering SHU Honors Program Fall 2015 & later | 21 credits

  • Honors freshman seminar (1st semester), 3 CR
  • Honors Foundational core course (e.g., HI101, or EN1xx, etc.; 2nd semester), 3 CR
  • Honors CIT seminar 1 (3rd semester), 3 CR
  • Honors CIT seminar 2 (4th semester), 3 CR
  • Two Honors upper-level electives (any time), 6 CR
  • Honors capstone (6th semester, or earlier/later depending on student’s academic program), 3 CR

Students Entering SHU Honors Program Fall 2011 - Spring 2015 | 24 credits

  • Freshman Honors Seminar  3 CR
  • CC101-CC104, Honors  12 CR
  • 3 Honors Electives  9 CR

*Students who enter the Honors Program at the start of sophomore year need not take Honors versions of CC101 or 102, but they are still required to complete 24 Honors credits, including: honors CC103, honors CC104, six honors electives.

Spring 2016 Course Offerings

As you read through the course choices below, please bear in mind the following:

  • Sometimes these courses have a pre-requisite. Please pay attention to this!
  • All honors course sections end with a letter followed by “H”.  For example, HS-301-AH. A course that ends in only “H” is NOT an honors course. Courses ending in HN should NOT be honors courses. To know for sure if a course is honors or not, click on the course and check the Section Restrictions (top left of Section Information screen) – an honors course should say something like “You must be in the HONORS Group to take this course.”  Then, make sure the course appears on the list below. If you see what appears to be an honors course in WebAdvisor but it doesn’t appear on this list, or if a course on this list does not appear to be an honors course on WebAdvisor, please contact Dr. Moras IMMEDIATELY.
  • If you have a friend who is not in the honors program but would like to take a particular honors course and has a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or higher, we may be able to accommodate him/her, if there is room in the course at the end of the registration period. Tell him/her to contact me and I will put them on a waiting list of interested non-honor students.
  • Please make sure you read the advising information I have posted on Blackboard: Organizations à Honors Program à Honors Courses.
  • Questions? Contact Dr. Moras at morasa@sacredheart.edu

Honors Electives that Satisfy Humanities Requirements

HI235-AH, McLaughlin, Women in American Society
This course examines the challenges faced by women in America from the colonial period to the present, as well as their contributions to the formation of the United States and our history. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which gender has been historically constructed in American culture.

ENG289-AH, Loris/Taylor, Positive Psychology in Literature and Film
In this course students will study the field of Positive Psychology from the interdisciplinary perspectives of psychology, literature, and film. Positive Psychology is the scientific study of the strengths and virtues that allow individuals and communities to survive and thrive. The assumption of Positive Psychology is that people want to live meaningful and fulfilling lives and that they want to cultivate what is best in them. In this course students will read and learn about this scientific branch of psychology –its theories, models, and applications, and read literature and view films that represent the themes, characteristics, and elements that constitute Positive Psychology. Finally students will examine and practice the ways that Positive Psychology can apply to their lives.

ENG239-AH, Magee, Walking and Literature
This course looks at walking as a literary inspiration. Authors throughout history have walked to get away from everyday tensions and to seek solace, refuge, and inspiration. Walking is not just exercise for these authors but is a metaphor for their lives’ journeys. The course will consider walking in its many guises: exercise, transportation, wilderness travel, and religious pilgrimage. We will also look at how walking shapes authors’ philosophies.

Honors Electives that Satisfy Social/Behavioral Sciences Requirements

PS289-AH, Loris/Taylor, Positive Psychology in Literature and Film
In this course students will study the field of Positive Psychology from the interdisciplinary perspectives of psychology, literature, and film. Positive Psychology is the scientific study of the strengths and virtues that allow individuals and communities to survive and thrive. The assumption of Positive Psychology is that people want to live meaningful and fulfilling lives and that they want to cultivate what is best in them. In this course students will read and learn about this scientific branch of psychology –its theories, models, and applications, and read literature and view films that represent the themes, characteristics, and elements that constitute Positive Psychology. Finally students will examine and practice the ways that Positive Psychology can apply to their lives.

PO121-GH, Rose, Introduction to American Government
Explores a variety of areas that collectively comprise the American political system. Examines the theoretical foundation of American government, the U.S. Constitution, political behavior, Congress, the presidency and the Supreme Court.

Honors Electives that Satisfy Religious Studies/Philosophy Requirements

TRS 343-BH, Stiltner, Philanthropy as Moral Action
Explores the content, sources, and methods of Catholic social thought (CST). Investigates its relevance to social-ethical problems in both the United States and the global community, with particular attention to issues of equality and inequality, economic rights and development, globalization, and philanthropy. Provides students the opportunity to develop initial skills of social entrepreneurship. Prerequisite: A 3-credit TRS course

PH224-BH, Bailey, Introduction to Ancient Philosophy
An examination of the beginnings of Wester Philosophical thought from the Pre-Socratics to the Hellenistic Period, with extensive consideration of Plato and Aristotle.

PH302-AH, Purves, Philosophy of Science
Science studies nature.  Philosophy of science studies how science studies nature and what the products of science say about nature.  For instance, where a scientist is usually content to use some method, a philosopher will try to understand what it is that makes that method a good way to learn about the world.  Similarly, a scientist may assert that, for example, Schrodinger’s equation accurately predicts the probability that an electron will be found in one place rather than another.  A philosopher may be interested in what it says about our world that we can only speak about the probability that a particle will be found in one place or another, and will ask whether this really means (as physicists usually assume) that the particle is not in any particular location until we look for it.  A scientist will make scientific claims.  A philosopher will ask what it is that makes the claims scientific. 

This course will focus on this latter question, sometimes called the ‘demarcation problem’ (insofar as answering it demarcates a difference between science on the one hand and pseudoscience, metaphysics, and faith on the other).  We will do this by tracking a particular conversation across four generations of philosophers.  First, we will look at Karl Popper’s classic text, The Logic of Scientific Discovery, which lays out much of what we now think of as the core elements of ‘the scientific method.’  We will then look at another classic book, which has been taken to be a deep criticism of Popper, Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.  Kuhn seems to call into question some of the objective rationality of science by situating it as a socially embedded project, with all the illogical messiness that implies.  We will then look at Bas Van Fraassen’s Scientific Representation, an approach to the problem of what it means to depict nature scientifically that avoids ascribing deep meaning to the underlying structures that seem to appear in our scientific theories, and instead takes adequate representation to be simply empirically adequate representation.  Finally, we will look at a contemporary philosopher, Heather Douglas, who is turning the question of objectivity on its head by asking whether science may, in fact, sometimes be better if it is in conversation with politics, ethics, religion, and other areas of inquiry that are clearly non-scientific.

Honors Electives that Satisfy Math/Nat Sciences Requirements

CS319-AH, Grodzinsky, Comp Ethics: Soc & Tech
Justice, Autonomy, Freedom, Democracy and Privacy are all values that can be supported or threatened by computer technology. In this course, we will examine these values as we address issues that arise at the intersection of ethics, computers, technology, and society. Considering that computer technologies are the fundamental infrastructure of the Information Age, ethical questions arise regarding access and control, privacy, property, identity and professional responsibility.  We will use oral and written communication to explore these issues.  This course will be supported on Blackboard.  It is through the Discussion Boards, for example, that we will expand our classroom and introduce interesting articles and concerns about computer ethics. 

Honors Electives that Satisfy Major Requirements but Not Core Requirements

MGT299AH, Lawter, Women in the Workplace

Explore the progression of women as a vital part of the United States workforce and the resulting social issues which arose from this change.  The course will focus on three key areas:  the history of women in the workforce, both as domestic workers and as modern industrialized worker; the social issues which arose as women became an integral part of the workforce; and the modern issues facing women today as they enter the workforce and pursue their careers.

Honors Common Core Courses

Professor

Course

Day/Time

Grigg, R.

RSCC104-AH

M 9:30-10:45, W8-9:15

Ekeh, O

RSCC104-BH M 11-12:15, W 12:30-1:45

Kelly, C

RSCC104-CH Th 12:30-3:15

Greeley, J.

CIT202-DH Tu/Th 9:30-10:45

What do our students think?

Honors Freshman Seminar

Honors Courses Freshman Perspective

Honors Courses Sophomore Perspective