Courses

Students Entering SHU Honors Program Fall 2015 & later | 21 credits

  • Honors freshman seminar (1st semester), 3 CR
  • Honors Foundational core course (e.g., HI101, or EN1xx, etc.; 2nd semester), 3 CR
  • Honors CIT seminar 1 (3rd semester), 3 CR
  • Honors CIT seminar 2 (4th semester), 3 CR
  • Two Honors upper-level electives (any time), 6 CR
  • Honors capstone (6th semester, or earlier/later depending on student’s academic program), 3 CR

As you read through the course choices below, bear in mind the following:

  • Sometimes these courses have a pre-requisite. Please pay attention to this!

  • All honors course sections end with a letter followed by “H”.  For example, HS-301-AH. A course that ends in only “H” is NOT an honors course. Courses ending in HN should NOT be honors courses. To know for sure if a course is honors or not, click on the course and check the Section Restrictions (top left of Section Information screen) – an honors course should say something like “You must be in the HONORS Group to take this course.”  Then, make sure the course appears on the list below. If you see what appears to be an honors course in WebAdvisor but it doesn’t appear on this list, or if a course on this list does not appear to be an honors course on WebAdvisor, please contact Dr. Lazowski IMMEDIATELY.

  • If you have a friend who is not in the honors program but would like to take a particular honors course and has a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or higher, we may be able to accommodate him/her, if there is room in the course at the end of the registration period. Tell him/her to contact me and I will put them on a waiting list of interested non-honor students.

  • Please make sure you read the advising information I have posted on Blackboard: Organizations > Honors Program > Honors Courses.

  • Questions? Contact Dr. Andrew Lazowski at lazowskia@sacredheart.edu.

Honors Electives that Satisfy Humanities Requirements

ENG 201-B, Hulme: Experiencing Literature
This class introduces students to literary expression across the globe. Through an analysis of prose (fiction and nonfiction) poetry, and drama, students will develop and refine their close reading skills, including understanding basic literary terminology. At the same time, the course focuses on writing and thinking critically about stories. Ultimately, this course will offer students an opportunity to “experience” and appreciate literature of the world.

ENG 233-AH, Magee: American Renaissance
A study of transcendentalists: Hawthorne, Melville, Poe.

CM 212-BH, Yousman: Media Literacy
This course expands on CM 101 with extensive examination of theories of media effects on behavior, values, and social/political structures, with an emphasis on contemporary media and the consequences of the shift to an online digital environment. 

PH 231-B, Knies: Introduction to the Philosophy of Knowledge     
The conditions that make knowledge possible and the criteria of truth and falsity. Selected representative historical thinkers.

TRS 220-AH, Ekeh: Introduction to Catholic Theology    
Introduces fundamentals of Catholic life and thought. Key doctrines examined are scripture, tradition, God/Trinity, Jesus Christ, sacraments, and the Church in the modern world. Additional topics might include ethics, spirituality, and the saints. Placed in historical context, Catholic theological reasoning about these doctrines are compared to theology in other branches of Christianity.

TRS 342-AH, Stiltner: Human Rights    
Investigates philosophical and religious theories of human rights, the modern history of rights, and ways to implement a human rights agenda.

Honors Electives that Satisfy Social/Behavioral Sciences Requirements

PS 295-EBH, Murphy: Health Psychology 
Focuses on the relationship between attitudes and personality factors and health. Emphasis on stress management and behavioral change methods for health improvement and maintenance.

SO 239-AH, Sallaku: Diversity and Oppression in Contemporary Society     
Emphasis in this course is on human diversity. It is designed to give students an understanding of the conditions that lead to minority emergence and the consequence of minority status; it fosters acceptance of diversity, cultural pluralism and social change.

SW 224-AH, Sallaku: Human Diversity and Social Justice     
Provides students with a framework for understanding how diversity characterizes and shapes the human experience and is critical to the formation of identity.

EC 202-CH, Trudeau: Principles of Microeconomics     
This course introduces microeconomic concepts such as supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, welfare analysis and labor market. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems such as the role of government, environmental policies, insurance markets, and income distribution. 

Honors Electives that Satisfy Major Requirements but Not Core Requirements

EX 230-ABH, Greer: Research and Evaluation for Health Professionals    
An introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods relevant to exercise science. Topics will include: conducting literature searches, scientific writing style, proper citation, study design, levels of measurement, parametric and non parametric biostatistics, qualitative data analysis, and ethical considerations in exercise science research. 

AC 221-AH, Scarpati: Financial Accounting and Reporting       
Emphasis on the information that the language of business provides for decision makers. This is accomplished by using a transactions-analysis approach. Individual and team-based problems and cases are used to stress accounting fundamentals as well as the global and ethical issues of accounting decisions. 

CIT 201 & 202 The Human Journey Seminars: Great Books in the Catholic Intellectual Tradition      
These two seminars are Sacred Heart University’s academic signature core. They provide students with an interdisciplinary, foundational understanding of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition from the classical to the contemporary periods. Using seminar pedagogy, these two seminars give students an understanding of the roots and development of The Catholic Intellectual Tradition as a 2,000 year ongoing conversation between the Catholic community of thinkers, writers, artists and the cultures in which they have lived, asking fundamental questions about God, humanity, society, and nature. In addition the seminars introduce students to fundamental claims of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition; enable students to understand that Tradition as characterized by open, rigorous intellectual inquiry in the context of a faith tradition; engage students and faculty in seminar discussion; and help develop students’ reading, writing, and speaking skills.

CIT 201-AH, Ciorra/Iannazzi

CIT 201-BH, Greeley

CIT 201-CH, Loris

CIT 201-DH, Rober

CIT 202-AH, Little

HN 300-B, Ignagni/McLaughlin: Honors Capstone  
This course provides an opportunity for the third year honors student to integrate knowledge learned through the Thematic Liberal Arts (TLA) core courses in the capstone course of the honors program. Students will learn, develop and exercise integrative, cross-disciplinary thinking through weekly class discussions and the writing and presentation of a long written artifact on a cross-disciplinary topic of the student's choice. This integrative seminar is co-taught, ideally by two faculty members representing two areas of the TLA requirements (Humanities, Social Sciences and Sciences).

HN 300-C, Jareb/Moras: Honors Capstone
This course provides an opportunity for the third year honors student to integrate knowledge learned through the Thematic Liberal Arts (TLA) core courses in the capstone course of the honors program. Students will learn, develop and exercise integrative, cross-disciplinary thinking through weekly class discussions and the writing and presentation of a long written artifact on a cross-disciplinary topic of the student's choice. This integrative seminar is co-taught, ideally by two faculty members representing two areas of the TLA requirements (Humanities, Social Sciences and Sciences).

What do our students think?

Honors Freshman Seminar

Honors Courses Freshman Perspective

Honors Courses Sophomore Perspective