Outcomes and Assessment

Learning Outcomes

The student who completes the major in Philosophy will:

  • Explain and critically engage with historically influential major theories of ethics.
  • Explain and critically engage with historically influential major theories of knowledge.
  • Explain and critically engage with historically influential major theories of metaphysics.
  • Explain and critically engage with historically influential major theories of social and political philosophy.
  • Demonstrate written communication skills, utilizing original research and argumentation about these topics.
  • Demonstrate oral communication skills in conversation about and presentation on these topics.

Program Goals

 

  • Students will gain fluency in and an understanding of the major problems and figures of the history of philosophy.
  • Students will develop competency in original philosophical reasoning and critique.
  • Students will become skilled at communicating philosophical ideas both in writing and in discussion.

Course Map 

 

Explain and critically engage with historically influential major theories of ethics

Explain and critically engage with historically influential major theories of knowledge

Explain and critically engage with historically influential major theories of metaphysics

Explain and critically engage with historically influential major theories of social and political philosophy

Demonstrate written communication skills, utilizing original research and argumentation about these topics

Demonstrate oral communication skills in conversation about and presentation on these topics

PH 251

I

 

 

 

I/R*

I/R*

PH 231 or PH 302

 

I

 

 

I/R*

I/R*

PH 272

 

 

I

 

I/R*

I/R*

PH 255, 309, 310, 311, 312 or 352

 

 

 

I

I/R*

I/R*

PH Electives

R

R

R

R

R

R

Capstone Course***

M**, A

M**, A

M**, A

M**, A

M**, A

M**, A****

I = Introduce; R = Reinforce; M = Mastery; and A = Assessment Opportunity

* The first course of these will introduce, the latter ones will reinforce.

** At least one, but not necessarily all, of the first four outcomes will be mastered in this course each time it is taught and for every student.  As such, our plan will be to gather all final papers from this course as evidence of whichever of the first four outcomes are exemplified by that paper.

*** This will be a new course, replacing the required ‘Great Texts in Philosophy’ course, PH 390. Assuming we can restructure the ‘Great Texts’ course for the Fall of 2016 to mirror what we’re looking for in the capstone (i.e. we’re allowed to run it with just a few students), we’ll be able to begin gathering artifacts then; otherwise, we’ll have to delay implementation.

**** This will be assessed using the students’ public oral defense of their capstone project.

Assessment Calendar

Timeframe

Collect Evidence

Analyze Evidence / Recommend Action

Implementation

Assess Implementation

Fall 2016

SLO 5-6

 

 

 

Spring 2017

 

SLO 5-6

 

 

Fall 2017

SLO A, B*****

 

SLO 5-6

 

Spring 2018

 

SLO A, B

 

SLO 5-6

Fall 2018

SLO C, D

 

SLO A, B

 

Spring 2019

 

SLO C, D

 

SLO A, B

Fall 2019

SLO 5-6

 

SLO C, D

 

Spring 2020

 

SLO 5-6

 

SLO C, D

Since we don’t know which students’ final projects will be on which topic, we will assess whichever of the first four outcomes have at least three artifacts, assessing no more than two of these outcomes; we’ll just save those we don’t assess until we have enough in that category to do an assessment. As such, I’ll call ‘A’ and ‘B’ the first two of those outcomes which we assess, and ‘C’ and ‘D’ the latter two.